Co-funded by the European Union

Glossary

A test

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B test

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E test

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References

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Akers, R. L. (2001). Social learning theory. In Paternoster, R. & Bachman, R. (eds.), Explaining criminals and crime: Essays in contemporary criminological theory (pp. 192–210). Los Angeles: Roxbury.

Bernburg, J. G., & Thorlindsson, T. (2001). Routine activities in social context: A closer look at the role of opportunity in deviant behavior. Justice Quarterly, 18(3), 543-567.

Blumstein, A., Cohen, J., Roth, J. A., & Visher, C. A. (1986). Criminal careers and “career criminals” (National Research Council (U.S.) Panel on Research on Criminal Careers). Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Council of Europe. (2005). Convention on the prevention of terrorism. CETS No. 196. Warsaw.

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European Commission. (2014). Report from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council on the implementation of Council Framework Decision 2008/919/JHA of 28 November 2008 amending Framework Decision 2002/475/JHA on combating terrorism, COM 554. Brussels

Freiburger, T., & Crane, J. S. (2008). A Systematic Examination of Terrorist Use of the Internet. International Journal of Cyber Criminology, 2(1).

Gilbert, N. (2007). Agent Based Models. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.

Granovetter, M. (1973). The Strength of Weak Ties. American Journal of Sociology, 78(6), 1360–1380.

Granovetter, M. (1983). The Strength of Weak Ties: A Network Theory Revisited. Sociological Theory, 1, 201–233.

Granovetter, M. (1985). Economic Action and Social Structure: The Problem of Embeddedness. American Journal of Sociology, 91(3), 481–510.

Hagan, F. E. (2015). Introduction to Criminology: Theories, Methods, and Criminal Behavior. Los Angeles: SAGE Publications.

Langston, M. (2003). Addressing the Need for a Uniform Definition of Gang-Involved Crime. FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, 72, 7.

Laub, J., & Sampson, R. J. (2009). Shared beginnings, divergent lives. Harvard: Harvard University Press.

U.S. Department of Justice. (2010). National Drug Threat Assessment 2010. Retrieved from https://www.justice.gov/archive/ndic/pubs38/38661/

United Nations. (2000). Convention on Transnational Organized Crime (No. Assembly Resolution 55/95 of 15 Nov 2000). Retrieved from http://www.unodc.org/unodc/treaties/CTOC/

Wikström, P.O.H. (2009). Routine Activities Theory, in Huebner, B.M. (eds.), Criminology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.